COMO – a Lake to Like

I love Italy: The gelato, the papagalli, the dolce far niente. Somehow my head got tangled in these clichés like a fork in a heap of spaghetti.

Sail and motorboats quay at Colico, the Northernmost village at Lago di Como - a lake to like
Sail and motorboats quay at Colico, the Northernmost village on Lake Como’s shores.

Funny thing is: On my frequent trips to Bella Italia, I actually find these clichés reflected in the reality around me.

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CAMOGLI – The Most Colorful Beach Town East Of Genoa

Camogli is a colorful beach town just one hour East of Genoa. You know, one of these typical fishing villages with tall, colorful houses that make Italy so picturesque and lovable.

View of the port of the colorful beach town of Camogli
Italy – just like praised in romantic songs.

Also, it’s definitely not by mistake that the bay that stretches from Genoa all the way to Portofino was named Golfo Paradiso, if you know what I mean.

Hence, let me guide you to beautiful Camogli so you can spend a day in paradise.

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ATHENS for First-Timers – Beyond the Acropolis

Yes, I’ve travelled the seven seas – at least metaphorically – yet never made it to Greece. This is ironic since basically all of Greece is located on the seaside. With 13,676 kilometers of coastline – that’s roughly the little something of 8,498 miles – and 3054 islands and islets, Poseidon definitely is boss.

Not the only amazing facts. Next to Golgota and the Capitol, the Acropolis is one of the hills on which Europe was founded. So there is no excuse that I haven’t visited the cradle of our civilization before.

Cat at the Acropolis in Athens, Greece
Although Greece is basically sea-girt, besides lots of water, there are many rocks. As well as cats.

So as we got nearer to Christmas and the holy days became holidays, the question of where I would spend them was quickly answered. Athens – for the first time.

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How I Became A Citizen Of The World

How did I become a Citizen of the World? Why do I have these itchy feet? Where does this greed for exploring come from? Why this fascination with foreign customs’n’cultures? Was there a specific moment? Or did I get injected this yearning for travel in homeopathic doses?

Renata Green on the Beach in Split, Croati
For the first time on Croatian beaches.

I’ve put together five anecdotes about my earliest – and most impressive – travel memories that might explain a thing or two.

It’s really amazing what my brain remembers, how these trips sank in and anchored in my mind and soul.

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Coming to America: From Northern Germany to the “New World”

In the 19th and 20th century, millions of people were coming to America. They left Europe via the North German ports in search of a better life in the “New World”, mostly the USA.

sculpture called Die Auswanderer, emigrants, on emigrants coming to America
This sculpture called Die Auswanderer, emigrants, is standing on the shore of the river Weser. It remembers the seven million passing through the port of Bremerhaven. Actually, this statue by Frank Varga was donated by the German-American Memorial Association.

As a counterpart to the arrival halls in Ellis Island, several museums in German cities remember the adventurous journeys of the emigrants in transit.

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BOOMTOWN BREMERHAVEN. A complete guide.

Last week, I’ve guided you through Bremen, Germany’s smallest Federal State that actually consists of two cities. Besides Bremen there is Bremerhaven, an exclave with an exciting present – and past.

Seute Deern
The Seute Deern (which in Low German means Sweet Girl) was the world’s last cargo sailing ship made entirely of wood.
In March 2020, one of Bremerhaven’s most iconic landmarks had to be scrapped. However, they are planning on building a copy.

After a changeful history, today the city is almost secretly evolving into a Boomtown.

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BREMEN – BIG and small. A complete city guide.

(Updated Mai 2020)

Bremen, located in the northwest, is definitely not Germany’s most famous city. However, visitors who find their way here will certainly be surprised. And even rewarded since the historic old town – partly a UNESCO world heritage site – deems like the capital of a fairyland. And you’ll run into some fabulous creatures and fairy tale figures, indeed.

The Roland in front of the City Hall of Bremen
Mr. Roland in front of the town hall: As long as he stands tall, Bremen remains free and independent.

But there is far more to discover in this Free Hanseatic City.

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LUBECK – a guide to Germany’s most ravishing city

Somehow Lübeck, Germany’s most ravishing city, has always reminded me of Venice. An innocently cute and relatively small city that used to possess such a political influence and economic power – reaching all over Europe and beyond.

Holstentor at Lübeck
There are quite a few lions in Lübeck – honoring Henry the Lion, the Bavarian King who after Munich founded also Lübeck in 1159. In the Backdrop the iconic Holstentor and right next to it the ancient salt warehouses.

Although Lübeck has incredibly beautiful buildings and alleys, seven church towers, three Nobel prize winners and world-famous marzipan, it does not suffer from destructive over-tourism. I don’t want to change that, however, I’d like to show you around one of Germany’s most ravishing cities.

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TALLINN – a small city with a great spirit

Estonia’s capital Tallinn cannot be described with a handful of corny attributes and some stock catchphrases.

Tallinn - Estonia: St. Michaels Church
Besides many lovely and alluring things, there is also a bit of creepy to see in Tallinn – which makes the city even more intriguing.

Overall, by the standard categories, this city is far too diverse, its past too changeful, its faith too inconsistent, its present too dynamic, and its future definitely too promising. In conclusion, a hub between the poles of history and creativity.

Estonia is the northernmost of the three Baltic States. Hence, culturally and language-wise, there are close relations with Finland, historically there are multiple cultural ties to Germany through the German Baltic states.

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