How to Visit the Biennale di Arte in Venice in 2024

The Biennale di Arte, one of the world’s most important art events, takes place every two years. Although Venice is certainly a place worth visiting even when nothing special is on, my post on how to visit the city during the Biennale 2024 will make your trip even more memorable.

Facade of the central pavilion at the Giardini during the 60th edition of the Biennale di Venezia in Venice in 2024.
The Huni Kuin Artists Movement, or MAHKU in short, was founded in the Brazilian Kaxinawá Huni Kuin Indigenous Territory in 2013. MAHKU designed the facade of the central pavilion of the Giardini venue with the legend of the Kapewë Pukeni alligator bridge.
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FRANCE: An Easy Circle Trip to the Five Best Cities to Visit in Provence

I’m well aware that the French Provence region is rather famous for picturesque villages and endless lavender fields. Well, you won’t find either in this post. I just can’t help it: I’m a big city gal, and therefore, on my first trip to this part of the south of France, I decided to visit five of the best cities the Provence has to offer. In Nîmes, I hunted for street art, and I traced the work of Vincent van Gogh in Arles. I danced sur le pont d’Avignon and enjoyed the much-underrated city of Aix-en-Provence. Finally, I explored the mother of all port cities, Marseille.

Windows in Marseille
I’d argue that Marseille is one of the most authentic cities in Europe.

No, I didn’t get to see any lavender, however, I saw amazing old and new works of art and fantastic architecture. I strolled through alleys, sat in squares, and took it all in. The sound of the sea and the calls of the fishmongers rang in my ears. I was in a French land of milk and honey wine and bouillabaisse.
I had a fantastic time and I’ll be certainly back. And then, I’ll also go check out the lavender.

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Two Days in MARSEILLE – What Not to Miss in the Belly of France

Marseille is a port city that has been around for a while. In fact, it is the oldest city in France and has always been a major hub for immigration and sea trade. Consequently, its heart is the Vieux-Port where fishmongers sell their catch fresh off the boat to this date.
For me, Marseille has always been a myth, a place of longing. Marseille awakens wanderlust, yet at the same time, it makes you homesick.
Marseille is a city full of contrasts and contradictions.
In this post, I show you what not to miss in two days in Marseille.

Old Harbour of Marseille
My heart will go on: View of Marseille’s old harbor.
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Best Things to Do in AIX-EN-PROVENCE in One Day

Thou shalt have no other gods before me – Paris takes this commandment very seriously: Because of French centralism, hardly any other city in France has the chance to shine, let alone achieve world fame. And Aix-en-Provence is hit with a double whammy, because it is also in the immediate vicinity and therefore in the shadow of the second largest city, Marseille.
Well, this way, only the real connoisseurs will discover this gem in the heart of Provence. Everyone else misses out on the breathtaking architecture and 250 fountains, hot springs, and thermal baths as well as 300 days of sunshine a year. They won’t enjoy either the iconic bouillabaisse and ratatouille or delicious local wine.
What’s that? You don’t want to miss out on all this?
Then you’ve come to the right place: In this post, I’ll show you the best things to do in Aix-en-Provence, one of France’s most exquisite cities.

Woman riding a bike in Aix-en-Provence
Riding a bike is a great way to explore the streets of Aix-en-Provence.
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One Day in NÎMES – What Not to Miss in the Most Roman City of France

Nîmes is said to be the most Roman city outside Italy. In fact, the city’s rich history dates back to the Roman Empire. It still boasts amazing antique monuments such as the Amphitheater of Nîmes and the so-called Maison Carrée.
Yet, on the outskirts of the historic center, you also find some truly remarkable urban art. In addition, you absolutely need to try some of Nîmes’ culinary gems like Brandade, a popular cod gratin, and my personal favorite, the Pâté Nîmois, stuffed puff pastry.
Do you want a glass of regional wine with it?
You know what, let me just quickly put into writing for you what absolutely not to miss when in Nîmes, even if you’re in town for just one day.

One Day Nîmes Not Miss: Roman Amphitheatre in Nimes
The people of Nimes really take good care of things: The city’s Roman Amphitheatre is the best-preserved one worldwide!
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NordArt 2024: Everything You Need to Know Before Your Visit

Last Saturday, the moment had come: NordArt 2024 opened its gates and is once again delivering a wealth of inspiring art to its visitors.
In this post I’ll tell you everything you need to know for your visit to the NordArt 2024 – but first, I reveal the secret of where the fun-sounding venue Büdelsdorf is actually located.

Eva by MojDa David Moješčik at the NordArt 2024
Eva by MojDa aka David Moješčik in the center of the humongous former production hall.
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One Day in ARLES – What Not to Miss in Vincent’s Picture-Perfect City

Already Vincent van Gogh knew it: Arles is one of the most worth-seeing cities in the French Provence region. In 1888, the warm light attracted Vincent to the city where he then created some of his most famous paintings.
Other travellers are attracted to Arles by the numerous relics of Roman antiquity and evidence of the Middle Ages.
Personally, I always appreciate the mix: Something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue. Add some delicious food and a glass of good wine: Life in Arles is a feast for all the senses.
In this post, I have summarized for you what you definitely should not miss, even if you only come to Arles for one day.

Amphitheater of Arles
View of Arles’ Roman treasures.
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VIENNA – visited by streetcar

Although Austria is one of the smallest countries in Europe, its central location and especially its influential past make it to the heart – or maybe the solar plexus – of the continent.
Austria’s capital Vienna is looking back at an everchanging and compelling history. Whether it is the Congress of Vienna where Europe’s layout and faith were determined after the Napoleonic wars or the powerful Habsburg dynasty including Empress Sisi and her tragic faith. Since the gilded years around the turn of the 20th century, Vienna has been the center of the artistic and intellectual avant-garde. Progressive painters like Egon Schiele, innovative designers like Koloman Moser, inventive architects like Otto Wagner and Adolf Loos, exciting musicians like Arnold Schönberg, and of course the father of psychoanalysis Sigmund Freud made a compelling case for the city’s glory.
Amazingly, you don’t need to join an expensive city tour to explore all the wonders this extraordinary city has in store. Basically, all the magnificent and world-famous landmarks in Vienna can be easily and inexpensively visited by a public streetcar!

View of the Kunsthistorisches Museum from the Leopold Museum in Vienna.
The Leopold Museum is not only worth the visit for the art, but it also opens to Vienna’s most beautiful views.

So hop on, let’s explore a city full of history, stories, and myths!

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Best Street Art in VIENNA

Vienna is famous for great art: whether it’s Art Nouveau, Expressionism, or the controversial Viennese Actionism – the city has stood for internationally famous art for decades.
But street art?
You’ll be surprised: Vienna has some of the most beautiful large-format murals I’ve seen in recent months.
In this post, I invite you to join me in searching for the best street art in Vienna.
Get ready to be amazed!

Best Street Art in Vienna: The Weird painted by Nychos, Frau Isa and Rookie the Weird located in Therese Sip park.
The Weird was painted by Nychos, Frau Isa, and Rookie the Weird and is located in Therese Sip Park.
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Street Art in SEVILLE: Arte Para Todos in the San Pablo District

Seville is one of those many Spanish cities where you can spend days just walking around. Squeezing through picturesque cobblestone alleys, enjoying tapas, bloodred wine, and passionate Flamenco. Visiting the Cathedral, the Alcazar, and the Plaza de España.
But apart from the many world-famous landmarks, Seville has some less glorious barrios located on the outskirts.
One of them is San Pablo located northeast of the center.
Instead of magnificent Andalusian and Moorish architecture, you’ll walk between rather sad housing projects. Nevertheless, I’m sure you’ll enjoy your stroll through San Pablo since it’s also home to the art project Arte Para Todos and therewith to the best street art in all of Seville.

Mural by Veronica Werckmeister, street art at the San Pablo district in Sevilla
Expectedly, there is also a mural depicting a fierce Flamenco dancer.
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